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Another year has passed and a new decade will see the dawn of day. Here are the Top 10 most read posts this past year.

  1. New Moon: Review
  2. The Vampire Diaries
  3. Twilight: Review
  4. The Vampire Diaries: Review
  5. Eclipse :Review
  6. By The River Piedra I Sat Down And Wept: Review
  7. North and South
  8. The Gargoyle
  9. I Like It When You’re Quiet: Poem
  10. Reading Lolita In Tehran: Review

Hope that you all will enjoy the new year and that you’ll be back here for new reviews and poems!

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The Gargoyle

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Love is as strong as death, as hard as hell

This book is a page turner. I’m hooked so badly that I think I have to be admitted into rehab after the last page has been turned. I can’t really describe what it’s like to read The Gargoyle, but so far it’s been disgusting, sickening and extremley alluring and I’ve only read a few chapters.

At first you will also be disgusted and have the urge to throw the book in the trash and lit it on fire. Just holding it will scare the heck out of you. But the story is one that will suck you in and you’ll start feeling that your fingers won’t let the book down unless someone else lets loose your grip.

The story: The narrator of The Gargoyle is a very contemporary cynic, physically beautiful and sexually adept, who dwells in the moral vacuum that is modern life. As the book opens, he is driving along a dark road when he is distracted by what seems to be a flight of arrows. He crashes into a ravine and suffers horrible burns over much of his body. As he recovers in a burn ward, undergoing the tortures of the damned, he awaits the day when he can leave the hospital and commit carefully planned suicide—for he is now a monster in appearance as well as in soul.

A beautiful and compelling, but clearly unhinged, sculptress of gargoyles by the name of Marianne Engel appears at the foot of his bed and insists that they were once lovers in medieval Germany. In her telling, he was a badly injured mercenary and she was a nun and scribe in the famed monastery of Engelthal who nursed him back to health. As she spins their tale in Scheherazade fashion and relates equally mesmerizing stories of deathless love in Japan, Iceland, Italy, and England, he finds himself drawn back to life—and, finally, in love.

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