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Mr Darcy,Vampyre is  a sequel to Amanda Grange’s novel Mr Darcy’s Diary. It begins on Darcy and Elizabeth’s wedding day and follows the two on their honeymoon trip to Paris, the Alps and Venice during a lull in the Napoleonic Wars. Told from Elizabeth’s point of view, the story is about her expanding horizons as she leaves the sheltered life she led at Netherfield for her new world as a wife and a traveler outside England. Darcy’s continued lack of physical attention to Elizabeth makes her realize that something isn’t quite right, but the clues provided in the text are too subtle for her to figure out his secret.

I haven’t read Mr Darcy’s Diary and I don’t think that I will read it after reading this sequel either. I don’t know how many times I’ve said that I hate when authors take an amazing story and try to make it into their own. Some manage to develope a decent twist to the story but others, like Amanda Grange, just don’t make the cut. I can tell you that if I was Elizabeth Bennet I would take a stake, stab him and find myself a new husband. I was bored with Mr. Darcy, something I never thought that I would feel about him, but Ms. Grange managed to make one of the most wanted men in fiction be unwanted. I have to stop reading all these craptastic adaptations of Jane Austen!

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The BBC apparently believes most people will have only read 6 of the 100 books here. Please copy and paste your bolded books read, italicized books as ”want to read”, and then sum up with a head count, so to speak. What does the list say about your reading habits?

1 Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
2 The Lord of the Rings – JRR Tolkien
3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
4 Harry Potter series – JK Rowling
5 To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
6 The Bible
7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell
9 His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman
10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
11 Little Women – Louisa M Alcott
12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy
13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
15 Rebecca – Daphne Du Maurier
16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien
17 Birdsong – Sebastian Faulk
18 Catcher in the Rye – JD Salinger
19 The Time Traveller’s Wife – Audrey Niffenegger
20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
21 Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell
22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald
23 Bleak House – Charles Dickens
24 War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy
25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
26 Brideshead Revisited – Evelyn Waugh
27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Carroll
30 The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
31 Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
32 David Copperfield – Charles Dickens
33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis
34 Emma – Jane Austen
35 Persuasion – Jane Austen
36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe – CS Lewis
37 The Kite Runner – Khaled Hosseini
38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin – Louis De Bernieres
39 Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden
40 Winnie the Pooh – AA Milne
41 Animal Farm – George Orwell
42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown
43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
44 A Prayer for Owen Meaney – John Irving
45 The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins
46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery
47 Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding
50 Atonement – Ian McEwan
51 Life of Pi – Yann Martel
52 Dune – Frank Herbert
53 Cold Comfort Farm – Stella Gibbons
54 Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen
55 A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth.
56 The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon
57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time – Mark Haddon
60 Love In The Time Of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
62 Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov
63 The Secret History – Donna Tartt
64 The Lovely Bones – Alice Sebold
65 Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas
66 On The Road – Jack Kerouac
67 Jude the Obscure – Thomas Hardy
68 Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding
69 Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie

70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville
71 Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens
72 Dracula – Bram Stoker

73 The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett
74 Notes From A Small Island – Bill Bryson
75 Ulysses – James Joyce
76 The Bell Jar – Sylvia Plath
77 Swallows and Amazons – Arthur Ransome
78 Germinal – Emile Zola
79 Vanity Fair – William Makepeace Thackeray
80 Possession – AS Byatt
81 A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
82 Cloud Atlas – David Mitchell
83 The Color Purple – Alice Walker
84 The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro
85 Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
86 A Fine Balance – Rohinton Mistry
87 Charlotte’s Web – EB White
88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven – Mitch Albom
89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
90 The Faraway Tree Collection – Enid Blyton
91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
92 The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery
93 The Wasp Factory – Iain Banks
94 Watership Down – Richard Adams
95 A Confederacy of Dunces – John Kennedy Toole
96 A Town Like Alice – Nevil Shute
97 The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
98 Hamlet – William Shakespeare

99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl
100 Les Miserables – Victor Hugo

Out of these 100 books I’ve read 26, but I must say that I’m surprised that none of Agatha Christie’s books were included or Paulo Coelho for that matter and many more authors.

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I walked into a cute little bookstore today, looking for nothing in particular and to my surprise there was a book titled Mr Darcy, Vampyre by Amanda Grange. Why do we humans lack so much imagination that we have to copy the same story over and over again?

When I came home I discovered even more novels that were connected to Jane Austen. There was everything from zombies, sea monsters and other supernatural species. But vampires was the one that stood out, there was even one novel were Jane Austen herself was a vampire ( Miss Austen Bites Back).

I know that vampires equals money these days, but that doesn’t have to mean that just because you involve them into an already famous story, the outcome will be great or even good. In my opinion it’s also disrespectful to the original story, it changes so much that it no longer holds any resemblance to what it previously was and the new author just uses the famous names to draw attention to their novel.

People should write whatever they want, but they should atleast try to be original when they do it. Originality is what makes an author rememberable.

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The story: Emily Albright is the manager of a cute little bookstore in New York and she decides she’s had it with modern-day love and would much rather curl up with Pride and Prejudice and spend her time with Mr. Darcy. So when her best friend suggests a wild week of margaritas and men in Mexico with the girls, Emily abruptly flees to England on a guided tour of Jane Austen country instead.

Far from inspiring romance, the company aboard the bus consists of a gaggle of little old ladies and one single man, Spike Hargreaves, a ill-tempered journalist who is writing an article on why the fictional Mr. Darcy has earned the title of Man Most Women Would Love to Date.

Opinion: The moment of surprise in the story is that Emily finds herself face to face with none other than Mr Darcy himself. That’s the last thing she expects to find on her excursion, a brooding handsome man striding across a field, his damp shirt clinging to his chest. Suddenly, every woman’s fantasy becomes one woman’s reality.

The fact that Mr. Darcy would even be remotely interested in Emily, who for most of the time is either drunk or accidentally high, is hilarious. He is after all a proper english gentleman and she is Emily from the block. If he didn’t approve of Elizabeth who was a well mannered young woman then there is no way that he would even consider taking a woman with no connections and an unknown background from New York as his wife. I don’t see Jane Austen’s Mr Darcy in Alexandra Potter’s version at all. Maybe that’s an unfair comparisssion since one author is famous for her pen and the other for banking on the other’s ideas.

But it serves its purpose as a spin-off. It has a hint of the original main characters and a twist in the story.

 

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I’ve seen the previous adaption of this novel and in comparison this version is the better one.  The main character, Fanny Price, is a young girl from a relatively poor family, raised by her rich uncle and aunt at Mansfield Park. She grows up with her four cousins, Tom Bertram, Edmund Bertram, Maria Bertram and Julia, but is always treated as inferior to them, only Edmund shows her real kindness.

When Fanny has grown up, the stern patriarch Sir Thomas leaves for a year so he can deal with problems on his plantation in Antigua. The fashionable and worldly Henry Crawford and his sister Mary Crawford arrive in the village, and stay with their sister, the Parson’s wife. The arrival of the Crawfords sets in motion a series of events that aren’t all in favor of the people inhabiting Mansfield Park.

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Lost in Austen is a four-part 2008 British television series for the ITV network, written by Guy Andrews as an adaptation of Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. Amanda Price, a keen Jane Austen fan from present-day Hammersmith, discovers the Pride and Prejudice character Elizabeth Bennet in her bathroom. Amanda curiously steps through a secret doorway hidden in the wall that Elizabeth had shown her, and finds herself in the house of the Bennets, Longbourn, at the beginning of the novel.

Amanda is trapped in this world, and Elizabeth is meanwhile in 21st Century London. Mr Bennet is hospitable, and Amanda tries to ensure that the novel progresses as it should. Mr Bingley visits Longbourn and appears to admire Amanda more than Jane. At the Meryton Assembly Hall she meets Mr Darcy and Caroline Bingley. Amanda gets drunk and kisses Bingley, immediately regretting it. Later, Amanda then forces Jane to travel to the Bingleys’ home in bad weather to get the novel back on track, but when she learns that this may give Jane a fatal attack of croup, Amanda follows her to save her.

Things don’t really go as they should in this adaption, the twists and turns that follow are worthy of a true Jane Austen novel.

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When people are asked which Jane Austen book is their favourite, most people answer Pride & Prejudice, but for me it’s Persuasion. Why? Because when I read it I feel that there is still hope for my own love story and yet I feel this agony that is ripping my heart apart because reality is never the same as fiction.

View this movie at Youtube:

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